Vaccinations

Vaccinations

You will need to go to a vet to get your dog vaccinated, as vaccines are prescription only medications. Different vets may use different brands of vaccinations that will cover different infections. Infections that are commonly vaccinated against are:

  • Distemper
  • Canine hepatitis virus
  • Parvovirus
  • Leptospirosis

Note: Some breeders will have taken care of the first set of vaccinations.
Consult with your veterinary surgeon about which vaccinations are required to make sure that your puppy is fully protected.

Puppies will be welcome to Happy Dogs Training classes if they have had their first set of vaccinations

INITIAL VACCINATIONS
Disease

Time scales
(depends on brands.
Ask your Vet for advice)

Significance

Distemper

8 weeks of age

Severe disease, potentially fatal

Parvovirus

8 weeks of age

Severe disease, often fatal

Hepatitis

8 weeks of age

Severe disease, potentially fatal

Leptospirosis

8 weeks of age

Can be fatal in dogs, may also be transmitted to humans

SECOND VACCINATIONS

Disease

Time scales
(depends on brands.
Ask your Vet for advice)

Significance

Distemper

Between 10-12 weeks of age

Severe disease, potentially fatal

Parvovirus

Between 10-12 weeks of age

Severe disease, often fatal

Hepatitis

Between 10-12 weeks of age

Severe disease, potentially fatal

Leptospirosis

Between 10-12 weeks of age

Can be fatal in dogs, may also be transmitted to humans

BOOSTER VACCINATIONS

Disease

Time scales
(depends on brands.
Ask your Vet for advice)

Significance

Distemper

At 15 months, thereafter every 3 years

Severe disease, potentially fatal

Parvovirus

At 15 months, thereafter every 3 years

Severe disease, often fatal

Hepatitis

At 15 months, thereafter every 3 years

Severe disease, potentially fatal

Leptospirosis

Annually, every year

Can be fatal in dogs, may also be transmitted to humans

Keeping your pet healthy

As not all infections can be treated fully a vaccination against the disease is the only method of truly protecting your dog. The vaccination provides your dog with a dose of the organism to trigger antibodies that will help your dog naturally fight the infection should the worst happen.

Distemper

Distemper is a virus that can be fatal. It can infect every organ system in your dog’s body and can produce a wide range of clinical signs including, increased temperature, ocular and nasal discharge, sneezing, coughing, vomiting and diarrhoea and a variety of nervous signs including fits. The dog’s nervous system, sense of smell, eyesight and hearing are often permanently damaged as a result of infection and not all dogs will survive.

Parvovirus

Parvovirus is most likely to infect young dogs up to six month old, though it can affect older dogs. It too can be fatal particularly in the very young and old. It is spread either by direct contact between dogs or via an owner’s clothing and shoes. Symptoms include severe vomiting and blood stained diarrhoea and high temperature. Damage to the heart can occur and lead to sudden death.

Canine Hepatitis Virus

Canine Hepatitis Virus is another potentially fatal disease. It is picked up by contact with urine from infected dogs and is most commonly found in young, unvaccinated puppies. It causes discharge from the eyes or nose, coughing and serious liver and/or kidney disease, appetite loss, vomiting, as well as a change in drinking and urination behaviour.

leptospirosis

Rats and mice or where hygiene is insufficient frequently carries leptospirosis and contamination of food and water is common. Symptoms include loss of appetite, vomiting, high temperature and discharge from the eyes. Liver disease and kidney disease may follow along with diarrhoea and increased weeing. The virus can be fatal, killing the dogs rapidly or much later from kidney disease. Dogs will remain carriers for the disease even if they recover.

Parainfluenza

Parainfluenza is highly infectious but will usually go away on its own unless the dog is very young or has an underlying medical condition. The virus can cause harsh dry coughing followed by gagging.

Bordetella Bronchiseptica Infectious tracheobronchitis

Bordetella Bronchiseptica Infectious tracheobronchitis, commonly known as kennel cough is a canine respiratory infection caused by Bordetella bronchiseptica and canine parainfluenza virus. These pathogens attack the respiratory tract and cause inflammation of the upper airway leading to irritation of the airways and a dry cough. It can also make your dog more susceptible to secondary infection.

Kennel cough can occur at any time of year but is most prevalent in situations where dogs are gathering in groups such as kennels and training classes, allowing infection to be transmitted via aerosol production from an infected dog. This can happen more commonly in kennels where many dogs will be sharing a common air space and are likely to be more stressed than usual because they are not in their normal environment. The organisms will very quickly spread from dog to dog as it is highly contagious although the infection is not usually serious. Clinical signs of kennel cough include a harsh hacking cough, which is often described as sounding as if the dog has something stuck in its throat. The cough can be dry and hoarse or productive in which case it might be followed by a gag and a swallow. Sometimes dogs might vomit which is obviously distressing. Please consult your vet if you think your dog might have picked up kennel cough.

Vaccination for kennel cough is available, which is administered through the nose. This can be given to puppies from 3 weeks of age onwards and will provide protection for up to 12 months. However, there are many strains of the infection and so immunity cannot be guaranteed but in any event, the severity of the cough should be reduced and recovery times should be shorter if vaccination has been given. If your dog has already been exposed to kennel cough and is incubating the infection, vaccination will not be helpful.

 

 

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